Saturday, November 10, 2012

Happy 237th Birthday U. S. Marine Corps


Image courtesy of United States Marine Corps Official Page's photostream-Flickr.
Image courtesy of United States Marine Corps Official Page's photostream-Flickr.
"From the halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli, the Marine Corps has answered the nation’s call each and every time they are needed. Today, we honor the courage and sacrifice of the men and women who claim the title of United States Marine.
As the famous first lines of the Marine Corps hymn suggest, the Marines have always had a worldwide mission. Their first amphibious landing occurred in 1776 with the successful capture of Fort Nassau in the Bahamas. As the spearhead of American military power, the Marine Corps has seen its growth in prestige parallel the rise of the U.S. as a world leader...."    
Happy 237th Birthday U. S. Marines Corps.
We hear from time to time about those who serve our country but rarely are we provided with the faces and names of our heroes. Below are a few photographs of individuals serving in the U. S. Marine Corps at their best.  As usual, the U. S. Marine Corps is always at it best.
On the Go Marines and sailors of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit step off a landing craft utility vehicle onto the shore of Breezy Point, a small coastal community in New York City, Nov. 9. The Marines and sailors of the 26th MEU are partnering with the 8th Engineer Support Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, II Marine Expeditionary Force as well as the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Guard in order to clear debris from walkways and public spaces in order to help the residents of New York City return to normalcy as soon as possible. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryan Nygaard)
On the Go Marines and sailors of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit step off a landing craft utility vehicle onto the shore of Breezy Point, a small coastal community in New York City, Nov. 9. The Marines and sailors of the 26th MEU are partnering with the 8th Engineer Support Battalion, 2nd Marine Logistics Group, II Marine Expeditionary Force as well as the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the National Guard in order to clear debris from walkways and public spaces in order to help the residents of New York City return to normalcy as soon as possible.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryan Nygaard)
Lone Wolf Lance Cpl. Alex Thoele, a CH-53E Super Stallion crew chief with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 466 ‘Wolf Pack’ and a Gaylord, Minn., native, watches the skies above San Diego, Nov. 7. Crew members keep their eyes on the skies throughout the flight to ensure other aircraft stay safe distances away from their own. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher Johns)
Lone Wolf
Lance Cpl. Alex Thoele, a CH-53E Super Stallion crew chief with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 466 ‘Wolf Pack’ and a Gaylord, Minn., native, watches the skies above San Diego, Nov. 7. Crew members keep their eyes on the skies throughout the flight to ensure other aircraft stay safe distances away from their own. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Christopher Johns)
I Spy A Marine with Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, stands security watch aboard USS New York as the ship transits through the Suez Canal Nov. 5, 2012. The 24th MEU is deployed with the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and is currently in the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility as a disaster relief and crisis response force. Since deploying in March, they have supported a variety of missions in the U.S. Central and European Commands, assisted the Navy in safeguarding sea lanes, and conducted various bilateral and unilateral training events in several countries in the Middle East and Africa. The 24th MEU is scheduled to return to their home bases in North Carolina later this year.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Michael Petersheim)
I Spy A Marine with Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit, stands security watch aboard USS New York as the ship transits through the Suez Canal Nov. 5, 2012. The 24th MEU is deployed with the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group and is currently in the 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility as a disaster relief and crisis response force. Since deploying in March, they have supported a variety of missions in the U.S. Central and European Commands, assisted the Navy in safeguarding sea lanes, and conducted various bilateral and unilateral training events in several countries in the Middle East and Africa. The 24th MEU is scheduled to return to their home bases in North Carolina later this year. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Michael Petersheim)
Picking Up After Sandy  Corporal Thomas Cavallo, an airframe mechanic with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 366, and Lance Cpl. Corey Shaw, a cook with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, throw a couch on the street in Staten Island, N.Y., Nov. 4. The 26th MEU is able to provide generators, fuel, clean water, and helicopter lift capabilities to aid in disaster relief efforts. The 26th MEU is currently conducting pre-deployment training, preparing for their departure in 2013. As an expeditionary crisis response force operating from the sea, the MEU is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force capable of conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations.  (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryan Nygaard)
Picking Up After Sandy Corporal Thomas Cavallo, an airframe mechanic with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 366, and Lance Cpl. Corey Shaw, a cook with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, throw a couch on the street in Staten Island, N.Y., Nov. 4. The 26th MEU is able to provide generators, fuel, clean water, and helicopter lift capabilities to aid in disaster relief efforts. The 26th MEU is currently conducting pre-deployment training, preparing for their departure in 2013. As an expeditionary crisis response force operating from the sea, the MEU is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force capable of conducting amphibious operations, crisis response, and limited contingency operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Bryan Nygaard)
The Same Breed  “Old breed? New breed? There's not a damn bit of difference so long asit's the Marine breed.” — Lt. Gen. “Chesty” Puller  The uniforms may change, the battlegrounds may change, but Marineswill always be America’s warriors. Each week we’ll take a look at, how as time goes on, we remain the same breed.  (Photos courtesy of Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections and Sgt. Aaron Hostutler)
The Same Breed “Old breed? New breed? There's not a damn bit of difference so long asit's the Marine breed.” — Lt. Gen. “Chesty” Puller The uniforms may change, the battlegrounds may change, but Marineswill always be America’s warriors. Each week we’ll take a look at, how as time goes on, we remain the same breed. (Photos courtesy of Marine Corps Archives & Special Collections and Sgt. Aaron Hostutler)
Today, we honor and thank those who have served in the past, those who continue to serve and those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.  We thank the family, friends and loved ones of these awesome men and women for their sacrifice.
I stand in awe of you all.  You are the best. 
God bless the U. S. Marines.
Sempter fidelis.

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